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I asked a question on what is the best way to go into programming field, especially where I can work from home, and my question was put on hold

https://workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/22712/what-are-general-traits-that-recruiters-look-for-in-programmer

Any advice?

EDIT

However, you're probably not asking this question because you're merely curious. Something tells me that there's actually a real problem beneath that question that we just haven't exposed. Have you interviewed for a job as a programmer? Did it not work out so well? Are you hoping to learn something that helps you nail your next interview?

Yes there is an actual problem, it's rather complex:

  • I've suddenly become a single mother (expecting in Oct 2014) and now I am wondering how I will take care of my child (other than grandparents, nannies), and would like to keep my options flexible
  • I'm currently at an IT job that is not the right fit for me. However I need to clear a certification related to my current job function by Oct 2014 (better to finish what was already started, I cleared one out of three required exams already, and I am very close to clearing the second one)
  • I am interested in a job that allows me to work from home, preferably with flexible hours, and the advice I have been given is that many programming jobs fit this description
  • I excelled in programming (and I was very focused while doing this, and I otherwise get easily distracted) in college and graduate schools, but it has been 15 years since I did serious programming. However if minor programming is needed at my job, my boss turns to me
  • How do I get back in the game? So far I've been given great advice such as actively participating in open source projects, set up GIT on my machine, actually do programming (don't worry too much about certifications), getting smart on algorithms, study remote jobs offered on stackexchange website, etc. Is there anything else I should think about? Time is limited right now, and I want to plan best as I can. I'll start working my plan probably in beginning of 2016 (after my child is more than a year old)

Would this be considered a detailed question? Perhaps TMI? Feel free to edit it to make it appropriate for these forums.

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    Since you are looking for specific attributes related to programming, rather than Workplace issues, perhaps you should ask in a programming community? – Joe Strazzere Apr 15 '14 at 22:38
  • @JoeStrazzere FWIW, question like this would likely be voted down and closed at Programmers.SE: meta.programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/6483/… – gnat Apr 16 '14 at 9:20
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The best questions on Stack Exchange are those about a real, actual problem someone is facing. These questions tend to be very specific and get answerers thinking along the lines of how to solve a problem faced by the asker.

As a Q&A site, questions that are overly broad, speculative, or which require extended discussion tend to not work out as well. In this instance, the answer would depend on the recruiter and his or her personality, as well as how he/she pictures the ideal candidate. This also differs based on position and the type of programming job. In essence, this question is primarily opinion based:

primarily opinion-based - discussions focused on diverse opinions are great, but they just don't fit our format well.

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than on facts, references, or specific expertise.

Additionally, this may be just a little outside of our scope, as Workplace SE deals primarily with problems faced in interviewing, professionalism, job hunting, and other topics listed in the help center.

However, you're probably not asking this question because you're merely curious. Something tells me that there's actually a real problem beneath that question that we just haven't exposed. Have you interviewed for a job as a programmer? Did it not work out so well? Are you hoping to learn something that helps you nail your next interview? If so, tell us about that. Tell us what you tried, what you think worked and what you think didn't work. Not only will it be a more interesting question about a real problem, but you'll likely get better answers that are based on problems you're facing as someone trying to master the next interview.

While the question is slanted towards programming, if you steer clear of technology questions, we may be able to make this question more targeted with a little editing. For further guidance in getting started with some edits, see the six guidelines to a good subjective question in Good Subjective, Bad Subjective. Hope this helps and thanks for participating!

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