4

My question Inability to get to work because public transportation failure was closed with the reason:

Questions seeking advice on company-specific regulations, agreements, or policies should be directed to your manager or HR department. Questions that address only a specific company or position are of limited use to future visitors. Questions seeking legal advice should be directed to legal professionals

but it should be absolutely obvious for everyone who have actually read it that it's the question for the general rule, which is neither company-specific nor refers to particular case (if it's not the case, I'll gladly reword it). I've tried to make that question as broad as possible, to refer to the general category of potential cases, caused by public transport failure in general, and not by specific issue, which was only an example.

Is there anything off topic in that question?

2

I reopened this, it had two reopen votes and both Monica and I agreed it should be reopened.

4

I don't think the question is off topic, but it is easy to misunderstand this.

  1. Someone from a country where this sort of thing is regulated by company policies and not by labor law will vote to close because they think it's about company policies.

  2. This part

    and the absence of work for long distance commuters will be justified and be considered as working hours?

could easily be misunderstood as seeking legal advice.

1

The question is the perfect example of off topic. Just look at the last two paragraphs:

What does this mean for German employee? Is it necessary to use own vacation days (which may be out after a few such strikes)? Or are such strikes considered an extraordinary condition, such as a tornado or flood, and the absence of work for long-distance commuters will be justified and be considered as working hours?

I'm asking about how labour law regulates it, and not what alternatives people have (for example sick leave).

In the 2nd to last paragraph: "Is it necessary to use own vacation days?" but then "I'm asking about how labour law regulates it, and not what alternatives people have (for example sick leave)."

The last paragraph invalidates the previous paragraph leaving only the legal question.

If the law says it is a valid excuse you are protected; if it doesn't protect you then you have to do everything in your power to get to work or take paid time off. The OP doesn't want to to know alternatives: stay at a friends house, pay for a hotel, sleep in your office...

This is 100% a legal question.

  • 1
    Yeah, it's a legal question, but it's not a legal advice. This little word makes the difference. – user1023 Feb 24 '15 at 12:51

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