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I have a question about my The Workplace Stack Exchange post: Loyalty to the CEO and/or owners, and communicating directly with the board

What should I do to improve it?

The close reason says that it's "too broad".

Is that the real reason, and if so what further information would you like?

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  • There are way too many possible scenarios to consider . For example, you say "what happens when CEO gets replaced?" What normally happens is the employees report to the new CEO, and business resumes. But clearly, that is not your question. We cannot tell what other scenarios would occur and how employees would deal with that, so you could narrow it down to a specific scenario. Your question #2 also complicates matters. As pointed in the comments, we prefer one question per post here. – Masked Man Jan 14 '17 at 17:14
  • Leaving that aside, #2 by itself has too many possibilities. An employee is expected to keep his boss in the loop on everything that he works on, but on the one extreme this becomes micromanagement, and on the other, the manager is completely clueless what his team is doing. Most teams manage to pick a point somewhere between the extremes, so in your case, the employee, the CEO and the director or whoever will decide how frequently the CEO should be updated. There are way too many possibilities, which you should narrow down. – Masked Man Jan 14 '17 at 17:19
  • I was asking about before the CEO is replaced, when the board might be planning a replacement/succession: does any board member talk with other CxOs? Without the CEO's knowing? Is it professional or unprofessional for a CxO to talk with (to be able to talk with) a board member without th CEO knowing about it? – Anonymous Jan 14 '17 at 17:19
  • Well then that is not clear from your question. You should edit the question to include that. Even so, I think it is still too broad. Will board members talk to CxOs? Some will, some won't. I don't get your other question at all, anyone can talk to anyone, whether it is professional or not depends on what they are talking about and the context. Anyway, you should make those points clear in the main question. – Masked Man Jan 14 '17 at 17:27
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(copying from comments)

There are way too many possible scenarios to consider. For example, you say "what happens when CEO gets replaced?" What normally happens is the employees report to the new CEO, and business resumes. But clearly, that is not your question. We cannot tell what other scenarios would occur and how employees would deal with that, so you could narrow it down to a specific scenario. Your question #2 also complicates matters. As pointed in the comments, we prefer one question per post here.

Leaving that aside, #2 by itself has too many possibilities. An employee is expected to keep his boss in the loop on everything that he works on, but on the one extreme this becomes micromanagement, and on the other, the manager is completely clueless what his team is doing. Most teams manage to pick a point somewhere between the extremes, so in your case, the employee, the CEO and the director or whoever will decide how frequently the CEO should be updated. There are way too many possibilities, which you should narrow down.

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