2

We have this question which has been closed as off topic for being about company regulations or legal advice. However, I believe it's neither, they are asking what are the possible repercussions of asking for a reduced working week.

This is a common practice with a lot of companies, and although some will have specific clauses about working a reduced week, it's not company specific asking what the consequences of working a reduced week could be and I feel is very company agnostic. Can we get it re-opened please?

| |
  • 1
    The potential consequences and what to take into account depend enormously on the location as pointed out in the comments there. You would get vastly different answers from the US compared to the UK for instance. There was also an AskReddit style question that I've removed, but even with that I'd probably want to see a location tag on this before I'd consider it properly answerable. – Lilienthal Feb 23 '18 at 14:56
  • I do agree having the country would be a great help, however that doesn't explain the company regulations or law close reason. I feel people jumped the gun on that one – Draken Feb 23 '18 at 14:58
  • If the OP puts in the country, I'll vote to reopen. – Old_Lamplighter Feb 23 '18 at 19:33
  • @Lilienthal there are even vastly different answers between STATES in the USA – Old_Lamplighter Feb 23 '18 at 19:34
  • @RichardU The OP has put their country, however it's the US, should we ask for state too? – Draken Feb 24 '18 at 8:25
  • 1
    @Draken It would help, but anyone with knowledge of the differences could answer. For example: if you're in a state like NJ, you can pretty much negotaite your hours as there are no restrictions, but if you're in Nevada, you can't because Nevada requires by law that if you work more than 8 hours per day, they must pay you overtime for any time over that eight regardless of how many hours you work per week. – Old_Lamplighter Feb 24 '18 at 13:53
2

This question has been reopened.

| |

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .