-4

My question here:

https://workplace.stackexchange.com/questions/119440/is-it-rude-and-unprofessional-for-a-hiring-manager-to-check-with-my-references-b?noredirect=1#comment378855_119440

has 2 delete votes.

Can I ask why?

Edit: It now has 3 delete votes and my question has been deleted.

All because I wanted to know whether it was rude or unprofessional of a hiring manager to check references before making a verbal offer official, and whether that could be a warning sign to not work there.

I am baffled by the treatment of my question.

I would ask the moderators here to take the lead and use your power to undelete my question, and to steer the community in the right direction, if people with high-rep are being rogue and destructive.

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    Thanks for raising this here, I'm rather shocked by the number of downvotes your question attracted. I suspect it could be because you expressed a connection between a common business practice ("offer contingent on reference check") and a hyper-controlling manager which most people will agree is far-fetched or perhaps naive. But the proper response to such questions in my view is to educate the OP on why their belief is incorrect, not to punish them with downvotes, let alone delete votes. – Lilienthal Oct 12 '18 at 10:45
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    For the record: "Thanks" and similar fluff is discouraged on this Q&A network. I've edited it out of both your questions. – Lilienthal Oct 12 '18 at 10:46
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    You can ask, but only the users who issued the delete votes can accurately answer. I don't see a reason for downvoting this or putting a delete vote on it. – SaggingRufus Oct 12 '18 at 10:49
  • @Lilienthal please see my edit - thanks, – Jalapeno Nachos Oct 12 '18 at 11:08
  • The question was just deleted.... – SaggingRufus Oct 12 '18 at 11:40
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    Given that the deletion is clearly contentious and that the question is now being actively discussed and considered for improvement, I've undeleted the question to make it visible again to the entire community. To be clear I don't believe this situation calls for any other moderation intervention at this point, nor do I support the idea that high-rep users have gone rogue. But I do think it makes sense to discuss how this question was handled, which would be problematic if most users couldn't see it or its history. – Lilienthal Oct 12 '18 at 11:57
  • @JalapenoNachos - If you want this question to stay undeleted i suggest you try to improve the question through editing. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Oct 12 '18 at 15:18
  • @Lilienthal did you consider (temporary) "content dispute lock" on this question? One like was mentioned for example here – gnat Oct 12 '18 at 16:10
  • It has one delete vote again. I'm tempted to edit the words rude and the entire 2nd paragraph out (because 1. why bad impression and 2. unwarranted micromanager assumption), but that may be against the OP's intent. @JalapenoNachos I suggest you do that yourself. – user8036 Oct 12 '18 at 18:37
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    @gnat a lock would prevent attempts to improve the post. – Monica Cellio Oct 12 '18 at 19:31
  • @gnat As Monica already said it would stop any attempt at improving it. By and large we don't lock posts until there's a clear issue like a close-reopen carousel. One deletion that we roll back hardly qualifies. – Lilienthal Oct 13 '18 at 19:40
3

There's a couple of reasons that I could see.

1) You pre-loaded the subject title with a negative bias ("rude and unprofessional"), so you're giving people negative vibes without even reading your question.

2) This practice (from reading the duplicate question) is common and expected in the USA, so your assertion that the hiring manager is being rude kind of falls flat.

3) This being practice being common knowledge, it should have been easily discovered given some research (either searching here or on the wider internet)

Having said that, the question title could have been softened by anyone with enough rep to edit it, and I can't really see a reason for it to be deleted any more than any other closed question.

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I had no idea if I was the one who posted the first delete vote. I just checked, I didn't post a delete vote. But I could have.

If the question was a good question, as a duplicate the question could remain in the system, as one comment said as "a decent signpost question leading to the duplicate"

But it isn't a good question. It uses in the question title and the question the words rude, unprofessional and micromanager. That moves it towards rant territory.

At the point I see it as a rant, I have to decide if the question should be removed or can it be edited. If the edit moves it from a rant by the dropping of a single line, I remove that line. But I feel that the multiple words that were used showed that the whole point of the question was to vent.

So I just voted to delete.

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    An edit is more appropriate delete votes are for unsalvageable questions – SaggingRufus Oct 12 '18 at 11:01
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    @SaggingRufus - There needs to be something worth saving in the first place. At -9 its a pretty good indicator that the question lacks that worth saving element. If the OP wants it saved they should try to improve it. – IDrinkandIKnowThings Oct 12 '18 at 14:02
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    @IDrinkandIKnowThings OP cared enough to open this meta post. All they need is guidance. If our first instinct is just close things without helping the user base why are here? Let's just close the stack. – SaggingRufus Oct 12 '18 at 14:10

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