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I know that occasionally, some of my answers and responses can come across as heavy-handed.

My particular weakness is when explaining a situation where a person may be technically right, but the personal cost will be far greater than any gain.

How should we phrase advice when the person is right, but the fight might cost them more than the win?

Example:

Employee has a clear case of employer malfeasance, and could likely sue, and probably win. However, having gone through the process, or helped someone go through it, you know that it's not going to work out well, and you think that the better course of action is to move on.

What is the right approach to advising someone that while they are right, and could win, the price of winning might be more than they wish to pay?

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    Not enough input for a full on answer, but I think you answers are fine - in fact I would go further and say they are usually great. Remember you cannot please everyone. Someone will always have a difference of opinion from yours, whether they speak it or not. And that is ok. – Neo Sep 25 '20 at 14:32
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I know that occasionally, some of my answers and responses can come across as heavy-handed.

Don't let it bother you, some people start hurting if a feather lands on them.

You're doing fine.

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    I see our "fans" have followed us in here. Excellent point – Old_Lamplighter Sep 26 '20 at 11:27

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