2

I seem to notice a bit of a pattern. Whenever there are questions that come up that involve some sort of policy, or law, a lot of people think: "Oh, this is asking for us to interpret the policy or law". Even when that is not actually the case.

Questions seeking advice on company-specific regulations, agreements, or policies should be directed to your manager or HR department. Questions that address only a specific company or position are of limited use to future visitors. Questions seeking legal advice should be directed to legal professionals. For more information, click here.

Example:

Stolen comission?

In this situation, we can assume that the OP perfectly understands the policy or law involved, but they suspect the policy is either unfair or misapplied. Asking HR to help them understand the policy doesn't actually address the issue. At the end, a problematic policy that is understood well by the person asking is still problematic.

Just to drive the point home, we can look at Kilisi's answer, which answers that question posed without even guessing the contents of the policy. The answer applies to any policy with similar sorts of short-sightedness.

So I suppose my point is, can we more closely look at the content of the question before assuming the OP hasn't done their homework, so to speak.

3
  • 4
    Very good points. IMO the question was not about the policy at all, but about how to deal with a management situation in a fairly common situation. Sales can be cut-throat, stealing commissions is a real danger, and commissions are more important than regular pay in some places. The question already has 3 reopen votes, I'll reopen it. – Kilisi Apr 8 at 8:12
  • 2
    It's definitely a pattern. Clearly, in the rush to cast a close vote, some folks don't bother to read the question. Or if they do, they don't bother to try and edit it to keep it open. – Joe Strazzere Apr 8 at 17:26
  • 1
    I think that having the close option for policy invites that close reason, to the point where people will vote to close if the word is anywhere in the question. That may be hyperbole on my part, but not overly so. – Old_Lamplighter Apr 9 at 18:09
3

The very first comment the OP got was to ascertain if it was a company specific policy problem and therefore unsolvable. More comments to elicit more info and then someone posted an answer based on that by which time it already had 4 close votes.

It has since been closed and reopened thanks to you, and has gone from -3 to a positive score.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .