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In light of this meta discussion, I'd like to know if this is a bad question.

I've provided a specific and detailed scenario with which I need assistance. Based on the comments and the answers, it appears that I have not yet provided enough details unique and specific to my situation. If I continue to provide additional details, does it turn into something more appropriate for a threaded discussion? Does its value to other users diminish? Would I have been better served asked generically for strategies to combat employee tardiness?

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I think your question is actually two parts -- One is some variant of How can I get people with difficult personalities to conform to expectations? which I posted as a related question, and the other is how specifically to deal with your team's use of flex time negatively impacting the company's productivity.

I think the question title is a bit misleading (tardiness isn't your core problem, I'd even dare to say it's a symptom), but the question of how to get employees to use flex time in a respectful way that improves overall efficiency is a fantastic one.

I'm not 100% sure how to make it shine though - I suck at writing good questions :-/

  • Yeah, the tardiness question was more because I was assuming a solution to help the first question you point out. – Jacob G Apr 13 '12 at 1:19
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I thought it was a good, answerable question. It didn't need to be too general. Of course, the answers got involved enough to end up in chat, but that's a good thing, IMO.

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What makes you believe that any of the answerers just don't get what your problem is?

If I continue to provide additional details, does it turn into something more appropriate for a threaded discussion?

If you continue to add to the question, probably. Feel free to rewrite your whole question if you think you can explain it better, however.

Would I have been better served asked generically for strategies to combat employee tardiness?

According to Robert Cartaino's answer, definitely not. Specific is by nature more answerable. For instance, if you asked generically, then the first response would be "that depends on why employee tardiness is a problem at all". That would be a bad question; what you have, I think, is a good question.

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I think the question is OK.

The question as asked has quite a bit of too local information but the question asked is a good question. I think I would generalize the issue to get away from the specifics. It does not matter if you start time is 930 or noon. You have a problem with people not respecting your policy. How can you deal with that is very much on topic.

By including all of the localized information someone may come along and think but i let my guys start at 1030 and still have the same problem so I must need a different question. It can be a fine line between too broad and to local. Try and ask the question in the most general way possible while communicating the actual question you have.

Most importantly you scoped the question with what should my next step(s) be? That was a good focused scope that is answerable.

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