34

I disagree with the close. It probably should be edited a bit, but even as it stands, it's a good example of a bad example of employee conduct. This is the modern day equivalent of the old story of getting together with colleagues after work, getting drunk and making a fool of oneself. Even though it's a bit on the ranty side, I think it demonstrates a ...


31

Your question wasn't "How should I handle this situation?" or "What should I do differently next time?" You went straight to "Where in the USA do people value rules?", which implies that people (including 3 managing directors) don't value rules unless they enforce those rules exactly how you want them to be enforced. You're not ...


29

I made the edit to the question. Here's my viewpoint. If it's a sexism thing, show evidence. As a result, the question will be closed because it's an HR concern, which is out of scope of The Workplace. If it's not a sexism thing, take gender out of the question, since it will only muddy the results. It was a simple change, I specifically mentioned it in ...


26

I downvoted because I don't like the premise or tone of the question. Premise-wise, it's basically asking us to validate and encourage obsessive, rigid thinking and behavior. Tone-wise, it's effectively a rant in disguise.


23

First off: I don't think that particular answer is a good one for the "Don't foo the bar" category and should be down-voted, though not necessarily closed. Don't foo the bar! An answer that just says that, is generally not an answer to me, since it does in fact not answer the question. When is not-an-answer an answer? When it explains why some ...


22

My answer to that question unequivocally states that I did not—and do not—see any gender bias in the meat of the question. That said, I do not believe it is anyone’s role but the original poster to address that issue/discrepancy. The reason being that there might be some gender bias but in the desire to post the original poster forgot to add those details. ...


22

This answer deals with the specific question linked not the general topic My problem is not that it is happening at a school but that the problem is an interaction with a student rather than a coworker. Because the rules for schools are actually different from those in the rest the world where if it was a customer that could just go to another store if ...


17

I think it should be returned. As it stands, the question makes no sense at all. It asks "How can I avoid discrimination?" but gives absolutely no indication of why, or how, for what reason there would be any discrimination against the asker. I don't think you can reasonably answer the question until you know how the asker is being discriminated against.


17

While this site has a rule of assuming good faith, it's fair to assume some of the downvoters thought you were not asking in good faith and were simply trolling.


16

Don't jump to conclusions please. Sexism in the workplace is an insidious and pervasive problem. But suggesting that the Patriarchy is trying to hide the problem by "washing away gender bias" is ludicrous. Stack Exchange has a policy of editing questions, sometimes drastically, to focus them on a core question, clean up the language and cut out fluff. The OP ...


14

As the question stands now it looks ridiculous, as it basically says "How can I prevent discrimination against me by using things about me that people might discriminate against." We have seen NUMEROUS questions about women facing discrimination, minorities facing discrimination, but apparently nobody outside a protected class can face discrimination. ...


14

Ultimately, I agree with the comment @JoeStrazzere made, and I think it cuts to the heart of the matter: when someone posts both the details and the conclusion they've drawn, they will inherently get feedback about whether or not their conclusion is correct, even if that wasn't the actual question asked. You asked, Surely it's better to assume that the ...


13

Is this question actually off-topic? Yes, but it should have had a custom close reason. None of the standard close reasons fit why the question doesn't belong on this site, but as you've commented yourself, there are plenty of problems with the question. The main ones are: it's about intentionally sabotaging someone's employment: while perhaps not illegal,...


13

I'll answer the question with one of my own: Would we be having this conversation if it were a nurse dealing with a patient, a daycare worker dealing with a child, or a prison guard dealing with the prison population? If we say "yes", then we should stop kicking things to academia simply because they are working in a school environment.


12

If it's a good question, then it shouldn't matter if the poster choose whatever answer is most favorable to his situation. I suspect that's what happens in the majority of acceptances anyway. A good question is a good question - no matter which answer is accepted, if any are. I'll bet if you analyze all the questions asked, the majority are looking for ...


12

I would disagree that it's an opinion-based question. While a good source for the data is hard to come by, the question itself is very objective. The three answers it has received so far seem pretty on-point. Chris Lively's answer is certainly subjective, but not opinion-based. RualStorge's 4th section should probably be removed, as it wanders away from ...


12

The question is too broad and the OP is requesting an answer to a company-specific question that we can't answer while the broader question has no useful answers. Bottom line, could wearing the star be offensive to others or slow my growth internally? As Joe comments, it's possible that wearing a religious symbol is a career-limiting move in certain ...


12

Here's a thought experiment: imagine the OP had asked about how to set up a donation box at his workplace for some other worthy cause than his own expenses in giving a free course, and how to do so without guilt-shaming anyone into contributing. My reaction would be that this scenario would definitely be on-topic. By extension, since the difference to the ...


12

It was deleted as "spam or offensive," presumably because it appears to promote a commercial interest.


12

It attracted a strong negative reception including spam flags because it promoted a particular store. It also didn't ask a very clear question and there was suspicion that it didn't contain an authentic question and served only to advertise the store. While that commercial interest was obviously disclosed, overall the moderator team confirmed the spam flags ...


11

So since clarification is required, let me clarify some points. As explained in the comments, the question is specifically about a person who is psychologically fragile: “she already consults psychologists for several years” “Being depressive, she also takes a lot of things personally” “During the meetings, she practically doesn't participate, and also ...


11

I think it all started going downhill when the OP Mentioned calling Child Services and Brought religious beliefs into it The fact that the original post was pretty rant-ish didn't do the OP any favors either. I, for one, tried to stay on message and answer the question objectively, however the OP's comments definitely seemed to me like the OP was not ...


11

The question has been reopened.


10

All our work relationships are modified by social context. Gender is not an arbitrary piece of irrelevant information: in many human contexts, it has real effects on how we interact even if we'd like it not to. The question could equally have been edited to remove the reference to the technology industry and make it a question purely about seniority. But it ...


10

General answer: It is possible to constructively ask questions that demonstrate an unpopular view. We've had them before. We usually struggle with them first, as people focus on the unpopular view (e.g. opposite-gender handshakes) instead of the workplace question (how to adjust one's work practices to dodge the issue). So, in a case where there's a ...


10

Disclaimer: This is from my experience as a mod here and does not reflect my role as an employee The title of the question is deceptive. If someone were to ask this question as a manager in Japan (where it is notoriously difficult to fire a salaried employee), I think it would be on-topic. The reason I think this is off-topic is because of what I think the ...


10

I stand by my edit and think it should stay as is. I agree with your edit, and the thinking behind it. Originally it was more a "please try my test and tell me how difficult it is" question. Inviting review of a linked or included test is a bad precedent, in my opinion. It would be the same as "please review my attached resume and help me make it better". ...


10

I voted to reopen. This is such a common problem in the workplace that I can not possibly see how this could be off topic.


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