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We have the tag which is used in 29 questions currently. This is definitely a useful tag, but it really only refers to leave taken by the mother who just gave birth. There are many countries and employers that also offer parental leave to fathers and adoptive parents, and logistically it's treated pretty much the same as maternity leave. Using the maternity leave tag for these situations simply just isn't accurate (e.g this question), which is why I'm suggesting a new tag.

I would like to request that a new tag be made and have assigned as a synonym that automatically redirects.

  • seems like a reasonable idea – Kilisi Oct 23 '18 at 2:37
  • Would it make sense to create a paternity-leave tag and also have it be a synonym for parental-leave? – Nat Nov 1 '18 at 12:23
  • @Nat I don't think it's necessary until someone decides to create the tag themselves. While "maternity leave" is a pretty standard term used across most industries, "paternity leave" is less common. I would expect that anyone who would want to tag "paternity leave" would also know to look for "parental leave" when they couldn't find it. – David K Nov 1 '18 at 12:29
  • I'm a bit curious, does this mean the tag also includes backwater countries that distinguish between parental leave and maternity leave? – fabspro Nov 4 '18 at 6:51
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    @fabspro Yes, I would say so. We can't have different tags for every country's slightly different version of parental leave, or health insurance, or retirement plan. If the question requires knowing a specific country's interpretation, then that country tag can be added as well. – David K Nov 5 '18 at 4:28
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Done. Tags are merged and a synonym from now points to .

The tag could still use a Wiki to describe it.

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    Thanks Lilienthal, I've edited the tag wiki as well. – David K Oct 23 '18 at 11:58
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Sounds reasonable. Maybe the tag-wiki for could explain that this is both for maternal leave in the proper sense (i.e. leave for mothers before and after giving birth) and for parental leave (leave for parents to look after their children) - just for those who really know what is what :-).

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Let me point out that, at least in Germany these are not legally interchangeable terms, and the first Wikipedia Paragraph also clearly lays out the distinction. Could be confusing for some people.

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